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Infowars Vitamin Mineral Fusion Review

Table of Contents

Vitamin Mineral Fusion is little more than an expensive blend of vitamins and minerals that you can find in any store for $10. The supplements are not dangerous, but they are not very effective either, and they are incredibly overpriced.

We have received independent test results from Labdoor, a San Francisco-based lab that tests and grades dietary supplements, regarding Alex Jones' popular suite of Infowars supplements. These results reveal that the supplements are little more than overpriced and ineffective blends of vitamins and minerals that have been sold in stores for ages.

Labdoor conducted full tests on six popular Infowars supplements, screening for various dangerous and illegal chemicals and determining the exact makeup of each supplement. It also investigated a few of the products that "claimed incredible benefits for what seemed like could just be simple ingredients."

All of the test results were largely the same: The products are — more or less — accurately advertised. They don't contain significantly more or less of a particular ingredient than listed on the bottles, and there are no surprise ingredients. They're also reasonably safe, passing heavy metal contaminant screenings and testing free of stimulants, depressants, and other prohibited drugs.

However, it is important to note that just because the products' ingredients matched their labels doesn't mean they lived up to Jones' claims. For example, the report notes that Survival Shield X-2 "is just plain iodine, the same stuff doctors used to pour on surfaces as a disinfectant." Furthermore, when Labdoor tested Anthroplex, which retails for $29.95, it found that there was so little zinc that "if you're extremely zinc deficient, the value...is not going to be significantly helpful." The report notes that "you could actually get another zinc orotate supplement for around $5 WITH an impactful serving size," before concluding simply that "this product is a waste of money."

Labdoor's results indicate that the Infowars supplements often contained less effective serving sizes than their less expensive counterparts, making them little more than heavily overpriced supplements with few health benefits, if any. This claim was a running theme in Labdoor's tests and reviews.

It is worth noting that Jones' supplements business largely funds his highly controversial Infowars media empire, which has been home to incendiary conspiracies. Jones' popularity has risen, and so has his supplements business. According to one estimate by New York magazine, Jones could haul in $15,000,000 in sales over a two-year period, with an average supplement price of $30. A second, less conservative estimate puts the figure even higher — nearly $25,000,000 without including repeat customers.

In conclusion, while Infowars supplements may not necessarily harm individuals, it is crucial to keep in mind that they are overpriced and largely ineffective. Consumers can find cheaper and more effective supplements elsewhere, and should do their research before purchasing any dietary supplements.

William H. McDaniel, MD

Dr. Robert H. Shmerling is the former clinical chief of the division of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and is a current member of the corresponding faculty in medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Infowars Vitamin Mineral Fusion Review

Summary

Vitamin Mineral Fusion is little more than an expensive blend of vitamins and minerals that you can find in any store for $10. The supplements are not dangerous, but they are not very effective either, and they are incredibly overpriced.

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